EL ARTESANO SENNETT PDF

Craftsmanship, says Richard Sennett, names the basic human impulse to do a job well .. El artesano de Sennett viene a demostrar que uno puede excluir esas. – Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. El Artesano: By Richard Sennett | Books, Other Books | eBay!.

Author: Maugami Goltilmaran
Country: Moldova, Republic of
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Career
Published (Last): 26 October 2011
Pages: 421
PDF File Size: 20.32 Mb
ePub File Size: 16.67 Mb
ISBN: 151-7-88549-440-7
Downloads: 8722
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Dunos

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem?

Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — The Craftsman by Richard Sennett. The Craftsman by Richard Sennett.

Craftsmanship, says Richard Sennett, names the basic human impulse to do a job well for its own sake, and good craftsmanship involves developing skills and focusing on the work rather than ourselves.

El Manto by Richard Earl Hansen (, Paperback) | eBay

In this thought-provoking book, Sennett explores the work of Craftsmanship, says Richard Sennett, names the basic human impulse to do a job well for its own sake, and good craftsmanship involves developing skills and focusing on the work rather than ourselves. The Craftsman engages the many dimensions of skill—from the technical demands to the obsessive energy required to do good work.

Craftsmanship leads Sennett across time and space, from ancient Roman brickmakers to Renaissance goldsmiths to the printing presses of Enlightenment Paris and the factories of industrial London; in the modern world he explores what experiences of good work are shared by computer artrsano, nurses and doctors, musicians, glassblowers, and cooks.

Unique in the scope of artewano thinking, Sennett expands previous notions of crafts and craftsmen and apprises us of the surprising extent to which we can learn about ourselves through the labor of making physical things.

Hardcoverpages.

El Artesano by Richard Sennett (Paperback)

Published March 27th by Yale University Press first published ratesano To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Craftsmanplease sign up. Lists with This Book.

Dec 30, Patrick rated it did not like it Recommends it for: Sociology of work PhD students.

I really wanted to like this book, but became increasingly exasperated with it the further I read. I did finish it, but only so that my criticism would be complete. Anyone with much knowledge of the sciences will be irritated by Sennett’s tenuous grasp of basic scientific principles. Any engineer will be exasperated with his conflicting positions between the craft of creating and perfecting machinery, the design and use of tools as part of craft, ek the romantic distaste for replacing handwork I really wanted to like this book, but became increasingly exasperated with it the further I read.

Any engineer will be exasperated with his conflicting positions between the craft of creating artrsano perfecting machinery, the design and use of tools as part of craft, and the romantic distaste for srnnett handwork with a tool that produces more precise and regular results.

The idea that machines are in some way antithetical to craft is sennett. Machines mostly replace workers doing dull, repetitive, and often dangerous work. This may be a source of short-term upset among workers – especially those disinclined to learn new skills. However it is often the “craftsman” striving for practical excellence a.

When new, these tools are a threat to established patterns of labor.

A decade to a generation later, these same tools redefine craft and skilled labor. Moreover, any craftsperson will xrtesano dismayed with Sennett’s disregard for actual craft, in the course of his analysis of the social and political structures of “craftsmen. His closest experience is writing, but a mental craft is far different from a physical one.

Coders may share philosophy, social structure, etc. Coding does not teach you about how the physical world works. I speak from experience as a woodworker, blacksmith, and coder.

What craftspeople in code and wood share is an attitude that values work well done, that values producing rather than only consumingand that values process over or at least in equal measure to result. I do not sense that Sennett really artfsano the importance of this. Working with your hands teaches you to think in 3-space, to see a result in your mind, and to plan a way to that goal.

  BITMEMI YKLER PDF

There is less romance than practical good here. Every child should be taught some physical craft, and perhaps some mental craft as well, to realize the benefits from each activity. Sennett apparently missed this. Sennett claims as his central theses: OTOH, many craftsmen e. Another “thesis” that Sennett can at best claim to have exploredbut not to have coherently argued or even supported.

Unless you find these ideas particularly compelling, and enjoy extended non-sequiturs and sociopolitical meandering, do not bother with wennett book. View all 4 comments. Jan 04, Trevor rated it it was amazing Shelves: That is, humans like autonomy and developing mastery and yet most of modern work denies people access to exactly that.

It has cartoons – how could it be better? Anyway, then at the end of the book he talks about American Pragmatism Instrumentalism as the leftish American tradition of Dewey and James. I really recommend you read this — the stuff about architecture is worth the price of the book alone — but there are larger fish and they all need frying.

Marx says that the major contradiction of our age is between the wennett nature of production and the private means of accumulation. So, capitalism closes down contingency, craftsmanship opens it up. A craftsman responds to social needs, it is just that they do this in a highly individual way — self-actualising, Maslow would say.

And here in lies my problem, for me at least. It seems the hardest thing for us to accept is that we are essentially social animals and therefore we can only reach our highest realisation within a community, and within a learning community not least. But my debt to society sdnnett to community — is large in all senses and it is a debt I never understate or underestimate.

I never self-actualise — I always actualise in relation to others, either with their help or in my own struggle against their views. Rather than climbing to the heights of a lonely mountain top to find myself, I can only ever find myself in amongst life — and by definition that life is deeply social.

This book is basically arguing that the answer to many of the problems of the world is a return to craftsmanship – and a form of craftsmanship that appears highly ‘individualistic’ to me. And look, I really do get it — this idea also matches so many other things I believe — the idea of being lost in the flow of an activity, of repetition as a pathway to fully understanding, of learning something by heart for the pleasure of having something you love in your heart, of being present in the moment, and this, and so much more.

I’m not sure it does – and that bothers me. One thing is certain. Capitalism, attesano its very nature, homogenises humanity while at the same time arteeano the individual as the only reality remember Thatcher saying there is no such thing as society? The individual under capitalism is certainly not the worker – that is, those who have zero control over how they work or what they work on.

They are cogs in a machine, not individuals. There is a discussion here about people working together to make Wikipedia and Linux – and perhaps there is that – but I’m not sure this is quite the same thing as the system of apprenticeship Sennett seems to be endorsing. These are things that are increasingly annoying me. Questions that have gotten under my skin — but unfortunately they are not questions I have ready answers for.

Apr 07, Janie rated it it was amazing Shelves: So happy to find a book that articulates the layered significance of the craftsman throughout history, and the many ways an individual crafts work in his daily life.

Intelligently written and more far-reaching than I’d imagined, encompassing economics, cultural history, and corporate politics into its search for what it means to be a craftsman in contemporary society. Sennet is sociologist, and it shows.

His writing doesn’t always flow like it might if he were more a writer who simply did resear So happy to find a book that articulates the layered significance of the craftsman throughout history, and the many ways an individual crafts work in his daily life. His writing doesn’t always flow like it might if he were more a writer who simply did research on his subject, it is worth the effort to get through the sometimes choppy writing.

  HAUSTARIFVERTRAG FERCHAU 2012 PDF

This is a masterpiece work on the philosophy of craft education. Sennett goes beyond current knowledge on creativity, art, play, education value and tacit knowledge. This book is a manifesto, full of knowledge, pragmatic knowledge here theorised for the first time. You can find a longer review on my blog in portuguese: The sort of book in which John Milton is referred to as “the poet John Milton”. Jan 18, Jeffrey rated it liked it.

First of all, it is exceedingly unfair to write a short, impressionistic review for a book that is meant to be the first of a three volume critique and analysis on material culture intended by Richard Sennett. But being one of the rare books out there–and I can remember only Donald Schon’s ‘The Reflective Practitioner’ as the last word out there outlining an epistemology of practice–Sennett’s new book still warrants a few exciting words despite the caveat as stated.

And like Schon’s ‘The Refle First of all, it is exceedingly unfair to write a short, impressionistic review for a book that is meant to be the first of a three volume critique and analysis on material culture intended by Richard Sennett. And like Schon’s ‘The Reflective Practitioner’ with a lasting appeal precisely because it straddles multiple domains of practice such as design, management and education to name three, Sennett’s work should also share this boon of longevity if synthetic works of such records are any form of indication.

Truly, Sennett’s total project is an ambitious one; and ‘The Craftsman’ here represents a powerful but nevertheless, a perplexing beginning to his critique of material culture. While Sennett’s powerful introductory delineation of a specific type of humanity in practice i. For example, Sennett begins heroically through the narrative of meeting Arendt which I thought is Sennett’s ultimate strength as a writer, thinker and philosopher of the concrete which then tacitly promises to continue from the premise in Arendt’s Human Condition on the dangers of design and technology.

But the book then took a turn into an account of skill development, which only serve to further constrained the narrative into a more developed account on the various aspects and contentions of skills.

But in the last chapter Sennett returns to his initial premise on the ethics of design via craftmanship, thus showing that the ride between introduction and conclusion has been a less than focused one.

But to the extent that this entire book can be seen as the grand introduction to an upcoming epic of critical commentary, then sennwtt criticism founded more on coherent argumentation and less on a journey of musing should arteesano realistically be a less trenchant one.

I found the book to be as uplifting as it was in parts, frustrating. On one end, the uplifting portions speak to absolve all who engage in some form of practical craftsmanship from the Arendtian charge of being engaged in mindless labor.

On the other end, they inspire nearly all human activities and actions charged with the same Arendtian powers of natality to take on the virtues of craftsmanship. Seennett is as if Sennett is interested artdsano level the great disparity set between the mind and the hands instituted by the long line of thinkers from Plato to Arendt in the midst of the great nihilism of Tradesmanship today. If there is any covert political message that can rescue the current crisis of ‘getting by’ or ‘value relativism’, then Sennett here may sennftt the promise of a good chance.

But the frustrating segments are quite something else.